YouTube – JJ 990 http://jj990.info/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 02:23:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jj990.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png YouTube – JJ 990 http://jj990.info/ 32 32 This YouTube star is “Moving In With America.” And in Hawaii he got more than he bargained for https://jj990.info/this-youtube-star-is-moving-in-with-america-and-in-hawaii-he-got-more-than-he-bargained-for/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 02:23:00 +0000 https://jj990.info/this-youtube-star-is-moving-in-with-america-and-in-hawaii-he-got-more-than-he-bargained-for/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — Markian Benhamou is a Los Angeles-based social media star. The content creator travels the country making videos for his YouTube channel. “My goal is to live with 10 families across the United States to learn what it means to be American,” he said. The 24-year-old calls his campaign ‘Moving in With America’. […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — Markian Benhamou is a Los Angeles-based social media star.

The content creator travels the country making videos for his YouTube channel.

“My goal is to live with 10 families across the United States to learn what it means to be American,” he said.

The 24-year-old calls his campaign ‘Moving in With America’. He has made five videos so far.

But his trip to Hawaii turned the script on its head.

“I went to learn about American culture, and instead I learned about Hawaiian culture. It was really insightful because I really had no background on Hawaii’s history and how people felt about it” , did he declare.

Not too long ago, Benhamou lived for three days with a local family – Hawaiiverse podcast host Kamaka Dias and his Big Island ‘ohana.

“I’m of Hawaiian descent,” Dias said. “I wanted to tell our story from us, not from someone else’s point of view.”

It wasn’t just about introducing Benhamou to the local grindz. Dias made sure Benhamou learned about Hawaiian culture, the true meaning of aloha, and America’s overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom.

Benhamou heard comments that surprised him like:

“I would consider myself so many things before America. That’s the thing.”

“I had grandparents who weren’t allowed to speak Hawaiian.”

“We are all in trouble. We’re getting kicked out of here.

“The big one was, ‘We’re not Americans.’ said Benhamou. “Every time I asked people, ‘Do you consider yourself American?’ They said, ‘No, we’re Hawaiians.’ »

The Hawaii video is now live on Benhamou’s YouTube channel, alongside those of his stays with Cuban, Jewish, Black American and Native American families.

“I love that he uses his platform for good and gives others a voice with this platform,” Dias said.

“What I really always lead with is an open mind and an open heart,” added Benhamou.

“I am here to follow the example. I am not here to impose any of my ideas. I’m just here to learn.

He hopes his overview of the 50th state will educate his 15 million followers.

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YouTube’s deadly craft and DeepMind’s new chatbot https://jj990.info/youtubes-deadly-craft-and-deepminds-new-chatbot/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 12:10:00 +0000 https://jj990.info/youtubes-deadly-craft-and-deepminds-new-chatbot/ Ann Reardon is probably the last person whose content you would expect to be banned from YouTube. A former Australian youth worker and mother of three, she’s been teaching millions of loyal subscribers how to cook since 2011. But the deletion email referred to a video that wasn’t typical pastry fare. Reardon sugar. Since 2018, […]]]>

Ann Reardon is probably the last person whose content you would expect to be banned from YouTube. A former Australian youth worker and mother of three, she’s been teaching millions of loyal subscribers how to cook since 2011. But the deletion email referred to a video that wasn’t typical pastry fare. Reardon sugar.

Since 2018, Reardon has used his platform to warn viewers about dangerous new “craft hacks” sweeping YouTube, tackling dangerous activities such as poaching microwave eggs, blanching strawberries and using a can of Coke and a flame to pop popcorn.

The most serious is “fractal wood burning,” which involves projecting a high-voltage electric current onto moistened wood to etch a twisting, rotating branch-like pattern on its surface. The practice has killed at least 33 people since 2016.

On that occasion, Reardon had been caught up in the inconsistent and haphazard moderation policies that have long plagued the platform and in doing so exposed a system failure: how can a warning about harmful hacks be considered dangerous? when the piracy videos themselves are not? Read the full story.

—Amelia Tait

DeepMind’s new chatbot uses Google searches and humans to give better answers

The news: The trick to creating a good AI-powered chatbot could be asking humans to tell it how to behave and forcing the model to back up its claims using the internet, according to a new paper from artificial intelligence lab owned DeepMind. to Alphabet.

How it works: The chatbot, named Sparrow, is trained on DeepMind’s large Chinchilla language model. It’s designed to talk with humans and answer questions, using live Google search or information to inform those answers. Based on how useful people find these answers, it is then trained using a reinforcement learning algorithm, which learns through trial and error to achieve a specific goal. Read the full story.

—Melissa Heikkila

Sign up for the latest MIT Technology Review newsletters

MIT Technology Review is launching four new newsletters over the next few weeks. They’re all brilliant, engaging, and will bring you up to date with the biggest topics, arguments, and stories in technology today. Monday is The Algorithm (all about AI), Tuesday is China Report (Chinese technology and politics), Wednesday is The Spark (clean energy and climate) and Thursday is The Checkup (healthcare and biotech).

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YouTube pullman pass helped lead Canada’s Tanner McLachlan to Arizona Wildcats https://jj990.info/youtube-pullman-pass-helped-lead-canadas-tanner-mclachlan-to-arizona-wildcats/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://jj990.info/youtube-pullman-pass-helped-lead-canadas-tanner-mclachlan-to-arizona-wildcats/ How Tanner McLachlan ended up going from a Canadian player in rehab to Arizona’s most trusted tight end in less than a year is an incredible story in itself. Add the origin story of his Wildcat fandom and the story becomes even more amazing. McLachlan, who received a scholarship the day before the season opener […]]]>

How Tanner McLachlan ended up going from a Canadian player in rehab to Arizona’s most trusted tight end in less than a year is an incredible story in itself. Add the origin story of his Wildcat fandom and the story becomes even more amazing.

McLachlan, who received a scholarship the day before the season opener at San Diego State, actually grew up as an Arizona fan despite living in Lethbridge, Alta. But it wasn’t until a trip to a UA-Washington State game with his high school team in 2014 that the connection really got stronger.

“Eight years ago, Arizona versus Washington State, in Pullman, and I was a sophomore in high school,” McLachlan said. “And I remember being on the sidelines and being a big Arizona fan, seeing Arizona burn out, and I knew one day I wanted to play for Arizona. I didn’t know not how I was going to get there. I didn’t know when it was going to happen, but I knew I wanted to be here. And it’s funny how life goes, because obviously it happened and I’m very, very excited about this.

The Wildcats won that game, 59-37, taking a 31-0 lead, and would win the Pac-12 South title that season.

“I know they won, because I was the only one wearing an Arizona jersey, so I know there were people, fans who weren’t too happy about it,” said McLachlan, who developed his interest in the UA via annual family vacations. in Arizona in the winter.

He did, however, begin his college career in 2018 at Southern Utah, an FCS school in Cedar City that Arizona beat 62-31 that season (but McLachlan did not play). His breakout year came in 2021, when in the spring — most FCS schools skipped the 2020 season because of COVID — he had 12 catches for 120 yards and two touchdowns in four games.

But it was that fourth, against Idaho, where he planted badly on a course and ended up tearing his anterior cruciate ligament. The surgery took place a month later, and just as rehabilitation began, the Southern Utah coaching staff was fired.

“I was at a point in my career where I knew I needed a change,” McLachlan said. “I was between two programs and I decided to bet on myself and that’s when I decided to walk here towards Christmas. And it was the best decision I made so far.

Arizona Coach Jedd Fisch said McLachlan was a “discovery of Coach (Jordan) Paopao,” and it turns out the person who connected the two was an ex-Wildcat Paul Magloire.

“When Tanner became available, we were (asked) would you be willing to bring in a tight end coming out of ACL surgery who hasn’t played for a year but has a good movie, and that is a really good boy,” Fisch said. “And that’s kind of what was the initial conversation when it was introduced to me. And then when he arrived, it was much more than that.

McLachlan committed to Arizona just after Christmas, and once he arrived he said the coaching staff had “stepped up” his rehab. Before that, he did it on his own, with the help of YouTube videos.

“After I had surgery, I had really good help from some people in southern Utah,” he said. “But then when I was between schools, a lot of it was YouTube, a lot of it was talking to other people who went through the same process, and just kind of figuring it out for me- I would just do random videos, I would watch where I should be week after week, month after month. Sort of, just play by ear and do what I was supposed to do.

Offensive Coordinator Brennan Carroll said he knew Arizona had something special in McLachlan from the start of spring training.

“We saw some lightning in the spring. he couldn’t do much physically because he was working through rehab, but we got the idea pretty early on that the kid had special talents and character traits,” Carroll said. “And he also has a great spirit for the sport, so it comes quite naturally to him. He’s a good athlete and he wants to learn. Great teammate. Just a kid that the guys love to play for and to play with. is not really shocking.

McLachlan earned a purse before the SDSU game, in which he completed a catch for 10 yards, to huge applause from the team. He also grabbed the cornerback Treydan Stukeshimself a former extra, by surprise.

“I didn’t even know he was an extra, I thought he was like a regular,” Stuke said. “He completely deserves it, he deserved it. I was so happy for him when they announced that, because I just remember how I felt when I got my scholarship as an extra. He worked his back.

McLachlan has caught four assists each of the past two games, the first tight end for UA to do so since Bryce Wolma had three consecutive 4-catch games in 2018. His nine receptions are one shy of 10 Alex Lines had all last season, and he’s the most in tune with a Wildcat tight end since Rob Gronkowski numbered 47 in 2008.

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YouTube filled with misogyny and harassment, creators say https://jj990.info/youtube-filled-with-misogyny-and-harassment-creators-say/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 14:05:05 +0000 https://jj990.info/youtube-filled-with-misogyny-and-harassment-creators-say/ LOS ANGELES — In April 2016, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki took the stage in front of rows of creators at the company’s second “Creator Summit” in Los Angeles. The event was a gathering of some of the internet’s biggest stars, and Wojcicki was there to listen to their concerns and feedback. She began by touting […]]]>

LOS ANGELES — In April 2016, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki took the stage in front of rows of creators at the company’s second “Creator Summit” in Los Angeles. The event was a gathering of some of the internet’s biggest stars, and Wojcicki was there to listen to their concerns and feedback.

She began by touting YouTube’s advertising growth and the company’s plans to expand its original programming. But when she opened up to questions, she was met with a barrage of criticism from female designers.

The female creators weren’t doing well, according to an account of the meeting in a new book, “Like, Comment, Subscribe: Inside YouTube’s Chaotic Rise to World Domination” by Bloomberg tech journalist Mark Bergen. Many were victims of vicious bullying, bullying and harassment, he recounts. Toxicity on the platform was escalating, they said, and the network attacks they faced online were growing more threatening.

Bergen’s book details how a designer spoke out against rampant bullying and explained she was terrified after another YouTuber made hostile videos about her, ‘doxed’ her (posted her personal info online ) and sent waves of angry followers to attack. Another designer took the mic and said she was facing similar issues.

Ingrid Nilsen, a popular beauty vlogger, was appalled when Wojcicki offered what she saw as empty sympathy with no commitment to resolve the issue, according to Bergen. “YouTube just didn’t have an answer,” Bergen quoted her as saying. “They knew the mess was really big.”

In interviews with The Washington Post, creators and experts say these issues are still a problem, despite updated harassment policies rolled out in 2019.

A report released last month by the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a British nonprofit, said harassment against women is on the rise on YouTube. Although the platform recently banned online men’s rights influencer Andrew Tate (after amassing millions in advertising revenue), other channels espousing a similar ideology regularly post and use the platform to increase their audience, the report concludes. Some channels are also uploading Tate content to YouTube shorts, YouTube’s answer to TikTok.

“Misogyny is alive and well on YouTube,” the center’s report revealed. “Videos pushing misinformation, hate and outright conspiracies targeting women are often monetized.”

Wojcicki declined to comment. YouTube spokesperson Jack Malon said the platform is dedicated to protecting itself from harassment.

“Harassment and cyberbullying are not allowed on YouTube, and we have clear policies that prohibit targeting any individual with prolonged and malicious threats or insults based on attributes such as their gender identity and expression,” said he declared. “We are committed to rigorously applying these policies equally for all creators, and encourage any user to report content that they believe violates our Community Guidelines.”

But in interviews with The Post, seven creators detailed how misogynistic creators mobilize their audiences to attack certain female creators. If a creative woman goes viral, they said, she will undoubtedly be the subject of a cascade of hateful comments. Posting to YouTube as a creator can feel like walking through a minefield, influencers told The Post.

“YouTube will turn a blind eye to anything that brings a lot of viewers to the platform,” said Abelina Sabrina Rios, a political comedian YouTuber in Los Angeles. “They’re aware that people on their platform are going to blatantly spew sexist and misogynistic stuff and it becomes fertile ground and they’re totally okay with that because it gets a lot of viewers.”

The creators said Amber Heard’s defamation lawsuit against Johnny Depp was a pivotal moment in the landscape of online harassment, emboldening misogynistic YouTubers and allowing them to collectively amass millions of subscribers. Depp won his case against Heard. The creators said the trial and verdict normalized a level of hate that has become commonplace on the platform.

“I was often called Amber Heard during the trial,” Rios said. “I’ve had people tell me they want me dead. It’s constant. I always add new filters to my comments, because that’s the only thing I can do.

Creators who have leaned into anti-Amber Heard content have seen their viewership skyrocket by posting videos that experts say are misogynistic, amassing money from merchandise sales and ad revenue in the process .

Matthew Lewis, a YouTuber from Tennessee known online as ThatUmbrellaGuy, grew his subscriber count to over 400,000 subscribers, mostly by posting anti-Amber Heard content. Depp’s lawyer said he had been on the phone with several YouTubers, including Lewis.

“YouTube channels like ThatUmbrellaGuy are no exception; they are the rule,” said Christopher Bouzy, founder and CEO of Bot Sentinel, a disinformation research firm. “YouTube is telling women that men have the right to post and monetize videos that are insulting and demeaning to women. ThatUmbrellaGuy’s YouTube videos have received over 116 million views and YouTube has refused to take action.

Lewis did not respond directly to a request for comment. He then posted a video saying that in the past years he hadn’t exclusively posted content related to Amber Heard, but had posted content about the comics. In a tweet after The Post sent him questions, he acknowledged his role as a leader of Comicsgate, a campaign starting in 2018 that opposed diversity in the comics world.

Many of Lewis’ previous titles include attacks on “social justice warriors” and “woke” culture, such as “SJWs Are Ruining Comics: 2019 Comics Industry Figures REVEAL He there is NO WOKENESS coming back!” and “SJWs never learn: SJWs learn a BAD LESSON from studying, hilariously missing THEY ARE the BAD GUYS!”

High profile women who talk about sexism or who are seen as too progressive are frequent targets of misogynistic YouTubers. Earlier this year, after a public outcry and a Bot Sentinel report, YouTube began downgrading anti-Meghan Markle channels and videos devoted to misogynistic comments about Markle, which was widely discussed in the press. British as well as on the web since she married Prince Harry.

The creators said they were frustrated that YouTube didn’t do more. They say the company views the harassment and hate campaigns as a “drama”.

“YouTube turns a blind eye when some of their biggest creators spew misogyny,” Rios said. “So the people in their comments really take that message and go out and harass the female designers, or they inspire the little designers and these little designers keep harassing the women and the cycle continues.”

Alivia D’Andrea, a wellness and self-improvement YouTube star in Los Angeles with more than 2.3 million subscribers, echoed those frustrations. Certain “commentary” channels, where YouTubers give their opinion or analysis on a variety of topics, are particularly disturbing, she said. “Commentary YouTube channels, especially fitness ones, will comment on my videos, react and analyze exactly what was wrong with me,” she said. Critics of her body are hurtful, she says.

People in D’Andrea’s comments section are emboldened by these videos. D’Andrea said YouTube commentators once used a screenshot of her feet on a plane to determine which airline she was flying on which date, then used that information to locate her school and called the school to get their class schedule. “I’m sometimes scared, I hope nobody will know where I live,” she said.

Akilah Hughes started making videos on YouTube in 2007 but quit the platform, in part, she says, because of the racist and misogynistic attacks she endured. She attended meetings with Wojcicki in 2016 and is appalled at the lack of progress on the platform.

Hughes and other creators said YouTube could do several things to make it a safer platform for women, like adding more robust controls to the comments section, banning certain bad actors and those whose channels are dedicated. only to attack specific women, demote misogynistic content, and provide more resources for female YouTubers who are being harassed online.

“The thing is, success on YouTube for women isn’t the same as it is for men,” she said. “It’s a target on your back the moment you succeed on YouTube as a woman. YouTube wants you to post all the time, they want you to succeed, but they won’t protect you once you get it.

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Why is Drake fighting with Anthony Fantano on Instagram? https://jj990.info/why-is-drake-fighting-with-anthony-fantano-on-instagram/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 19:21:07 +0000 https://jj990.info/why-is-drake-fighting-with-anthony-fantano-on-instagram/ Drake isn’t too happy with YouTube music critic Anthony Fantano’s latest joke. According to Variety, the “Honestly, Nevermind” rapper leaked his own Instagram messages with Fantano on Thursday night in an effort to clarify that he hadn’t privately messaged the popular YouTuber. Earlier today, Fantano posted a YouTube video, titled “Drake Slid Into My DMs,” […]]]>

Drake isn’t too happy with YouTube music critic Anthony Fantano’s latest joke.

According to Variety, the “Honestly, Nevermind” rapper leaked his own Instagram messages with Fantano on Thursday night in an effort to clarify that he hadn’t privately messaged the popular YouTuber. Earlier today, Fantano posted a YouTube video, titled “Drake Slid Into My DMs,” featuring a since-debunked conversation with Drizzy.

“I know we don’t really agree on the music and you’re not the biggest fan of my albums (thanks for the kind words on Take Care and if you’re reading this). But that’s what that it is, you know,” Drake’s first fake DM told Fantano.

Fantano, known for rating albums on a 1-10 scale on his YouTube channel theneedledrop and for his trolling humor, continued the track in his video. In a second fabricated post, “Drake” said he “can always hope you like the next one.” Fantano goes on to claim that the “Sticky” rapper also sent him a recipe for vegan cookies.

The music critic then read the recipe in its entirety with instructions, ingredients, and even a few typos.

“I would really appreciate it if you could give this a try and let me know if it’s worth trying for myself! I appreciate you! Drizzy out!” said the latest ‘Drake’ DM.

The real Drake, however, wasn’t so amused by Fantano’s stunt. In response to the YouTube video, he shared a screenshot of his real messages to Fantano on his Instagram story.

“Your existence is a light 1. And the 1 is because you are a living one,” the first post read, Variety reported. The “light 1” echoes Fantano’s review scale.

“And because you kind of married a black girl. I feel a slight to decent 1 on your existence,” Drake said in another post. The rapper’s screenshot showed no previous messages to or from Fantano. Not even the long vegan cookie recipe.

Clearly, Champagne Papi was embarrassed by Fantano’s fake Instagram posts. But, Fantano loves that Drake “shares the salty a— DM to over 100 million people,” he tweeted late Thursday night.

Fantano was previously a thorn in Drake’s side.

He said the rapper’s latest, “Honestly, Nevermind,” is “NOT GOOD.” In 2021, “the internet’s busiest music nerd” gave Drizzle’s “Certified Lover Boy” a “slight 3” out of 10. Fantano’s highest rating for the Canadian rapper was for his “Si you’re reading this, it’s too late”, which received a “strong 7 against a light 8”.

“I actually love a lot of this album. Even though this record isn’t considered one of Drake’s biggest projects, historically, I think it’s my favorite commercial project that he has. dropped until now,” Fantano said in his 2015 review. “If you’re looking for simple, understated yet very catchy pop rap with a lot of confidence and a lot of bragging, then I’d check this record out.”

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YouTube Shorts integrates more tightly with YouTube Music • TechCrunch https://jj990.info/youtube-shorts-integrates-more-tightly-with-youtube-music-techcrunch/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 19:39:31 +0000 https://jj990.info/youtube-shorts-integrates-more-tightly-with-youtube-music-techcrunch/ Music is a powerful force in the short video sphere – so powerful it can resurrect a 37-year-old Kate Bush song. Today, YouTube Shorts announced that it will integrate the songs you saved from YouTube or YouTube Music into the video app. You can also save songs you hear on Shorts to listen to later. […]]]>

Music is a powerful force in the short video sphere – so powerful it can resurrect a 37-year-old Kate Bush song. Today, YouTube Shorts announced that it will integrate the songs you saved from YouTube or YouTube Music into the video app. You can also save songs you hear on Shorts to listen to later.

When watching a YouTube short, you can tap the sound button in the lower right corner, which, like TikTok, takes you to a page of shorts that also use sound. Now a “save” icon will also appear on this page, allowing you to revisit the song later on YouTube or YouTube Music in a playlist called “Sounds from Shorts”. Conversely, if you hear a song that you want to use later in a Shorts, you can save it to this playlist to access it from Shorts.

Picture credits: Youtube

With Sounds on Shorts, YouTube is finally getting what it has that TikTok doesn’t have: a comprehensive repository of YouTube videos and a music streaming service. But TikTok is supposedly considering a potential streaming service itself. In May, TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, filed a trademark application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in May for a service called “TikTok Music.” The filing suggests the mark could be applied to a mobile app that would allow users to buy, play, share and download music.

TikTok released a report last year that said 175 songs that were trending on the short-form video platform ended up on the Billboard 100 chart, so it makes sense that the company would want to deepen its focus on music.

ByteDance already operates a music streaming app in India called Resso. A former ByteDance employee told TechCrunch that the company even considered calling this product “TikTok Music.” TikTok also operates a music distribution and marketing platform called SoundOn.

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Ninja and Pokimane ignore Twitch offers to stream on YouTube, TikTok https://jj990.info/ninja-and-pokimane-ignore-twitch-offers-to-stream-on-youtube-tiktok/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:26:00 +0000 https://jj990.info/ninja-and-pokimane-ignore-twitch-offers-to-stream-on-youtube-tiktok/ It wasn’t too long ago that Tyler “Ninja” Blevins was almost a staple on Twitch. A breakout in 2018 saw him stream with Drake and become inextricably linked to the meteoric rise of “Fortnite”, alongside other rising big names like Imane “Pokimane” Anys. Fast forward four years, and both believe their future lies beyond the […]]]>

It wasn’t too long ago that Tyler “Ninja” Blevins was almost a staple on Twitch. A breakout in 2018 saw him stream with Drake and become inextricably linked to the meteoric rise of “Fortnite”, alongside other rising big names like Imane “Pokimane” Anys. Fast forward four years, and both believe their future lies beyond the purple walls of Twitch.

Thursday, Blevins announcement that from now on it will be streaming simultaneously on “all platforms” – specifically Twitch, YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, Instagram and Twitter. This follows a similar announcement from Anys last week in which she said she plans to drastically reduce the time she streams video games on Twitch in favor of more diverse streaming of videos and shorts. on topics such as fashion and travel on YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram.

While neither plan to ditch Twitch completely, they no longer see the benefit of Twitch exclusivity in an era where Twitch is offering less money (when it offers exclusivity contracts) and where creators push back against the unpredictability of individual platforms by putting their eggs in multiple baskets. Additionally, Twitch recently informed partner streamers who don’t have an exclusive contract that they are now free to stream on other platforms like YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok, another concession to long-running issues. dated and unsolvable as discoverability in a time when Twitch faces more competition than ever.

Ninja isn’t Twitch’s biggest streamer anymore, but he’s made peace with it

During her announcement – ​​which came after a month-long streaming hiatus – Anys spoke of the mental toll of nearly a decade of streaming.

“Putting myself up so much, especially streaming, revolves around this constant feedback loop of people telling you what they think of you,” she said, referring to the thousands of online comments that she receives every day. “As an adult in your formative years, you discover who you are, you discover yourself. And I feel like when I’m constantly pushing myself, I don’t take time to reflect or grow as an individual – or think about what I love.

During her month off, Anys reflected and realized, “Nowadays when I see things on Twitch, I feel like I’ve been there, I’ve done that,” a- she declared. “I’m not really, really excited or passionate about much.”

She then tearfully explained that she felt like she was “closing a chapter” by focusing on Twitch, but that this change is necessary for her mental and emotional well-being.

Blevins also made his announcement after what appeared to be a mental health-related crisis – but which in retrospect seems to have been a promotional stunt. Last week, he abruptly ended a stream in which he got frustrated while playing “Fortnite.” saying, “I just need a break…I don’t know when or where I’ll be back.” Shortly after, he changed his Twitter display name to “User Not Found” and replaced his profile picture with a default blank image. He also lost partner status on Twitch.

Many engaged with this sincerely, wishing Blevins a speedy recovery from the burnout that has now become an epidemic among streamers. But the move coincided with the end of his two-year Twitch exclusivity contract – which he first announced in September 2020. Some streamers, like Anys and Hasan “HasanAbi” Piker, suspected a marketing stunt.

This week, they seemed to have been right. Following Anys’ heartfelt video on the subject, the move left a sour taste in many creators’ mouths.

“Seeing Ninja use mental health as a marketing tool to [his] the last adventure is pretty [crummy]”, said a Twitch partner and trainee therapist who goes by the Jebro handle, using a vulgar term for movement. “It further stigmatizes mental health in the realm of streaming. …People have real mental health issues everywhere. It makes me sick, honestly.

From 2021: Ninja’s “Valorant” experience is over, but his team continues

“The ‘User not found’ set [thing] had people legitimately worried because it mimicked a lot of people who suffer from internal demons,” said The champion of “Mario Kart” Bassem “BearUNLV” Dahdouh. “It was terribly executed and anyone who thought it was a good idea has no empathy.”

On Friday, Blevins streamed across all of the aforementioned platforms, trying to juggle chats on Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook — with mixed success. He didn’t read the chat on the platform where he unexpectedly found the most success: TikTok, on which he drew more than 17,000 concurrent viewers, compared to around 13,000 on Twitch, 8,000 on YouTube and 1,000 on Facebook and Twitter. Given that Blevins landed in a similar range on Twitch before the platform switch, you could call it a success – but with the caveat that streamers almost always experience inflated numbers immediately after a big move.

“This is crazy,” he repeatedly said at the start of the stream.

Blevins and Anys aren’t alone when it comes to hitting a wall with live streaming on Twitch. Staying on top requires a grueling schedule and an eagle eye for ever-changing trends, and that’s if you can fight your way to the top in the first place on a platform with well-documented discoverability issues. Even — and perhaps especially — the best are doomed to burnout. Now we’re starting to see not just what comes next for individual creators, but how that inevitability is redefining the idea of ​​what a Twitch streamer even is.

As always, Twitch remains the biggest game in town when it comes to live streaming, but it’s not hard to envision a future in which the majority of current Twitch creators view streaming as a single tool in a much larger cross-platform toolbox, in which only a privileged few consider themselves principally Twitch streamers. Blevins and Anys aren’t the first to turn Twitch from a main gig into a side hustle. They probably won’t be the last.

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How to Get Paid on YouTube | Family finances https://jj990.info/how-to-get-paid-on-youtube-family-finances/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:12:00 +0000 https://jj990.info/how-to-get-paid-on-youtube-family-finances/ Whether you’re doing daily vlogs or makeup tutorials, creators have the potential to reach huge audiences on YouTube, as more than 2 billion people log on to the video site every month. But while many creators now earn enough to focus on producing their YouTube videos full-time, making money on YouTube isn’t easy. It requires […]]]>

Whether you’re doing daily vlogs or makeup tutorials, creators have the potential to reach huge audiences on YouTube, as more than 2 billion people log on to the video site every month.

But while many creators now earn enough to focus on producing their YouTube videos full-time, making money on YouTube isn’t easy. It requires dedication, a targeted strategy and, of course, good content.

Here are five steps to making money on YouTube:

  1. Focus on your content.
  2. Grow your audience.
  3. Sign up for the YouTube Partner Program.
  4. Look for other sources of income.
  5. Be patient.

Focus on your content

Making money on YouTube requires building an audience and getting views on your videos. The best way to do this is to create quality content.

Find an area where you have unique expertise or a niche that has a dedicated fanbase and start posting content regularly.

“Consistency is key,” says Hallease Narvaez, a filmmaker with nearly 90,000 YouTube subscribers who began focusing in 2015 on monetizing her channel primarily focused on black women and natural hair. “Whatever identities you hold, lean into them and try to speak as authentically as possible. If you’re not authentic, your audience will know.

Grow your audience

An important way to grow your audience is to use other social media platforms to help you build your brand and gain new followers. Andrew Lokenauth, a personal finance influencer with nearly 3,000 YouTube subscribers, says he’s used his higher followings on TikTok, Instagram and Twitter as funnels to start growing his YouTube numbers.

“If you take the time to produce content on YouTube, you can reuse it on other platforms,” ​​he says. “You can put the best 30-second hooks on TikTok and Instagram reels or type them on Twitter.”

Join the YouTube Partner Program

The most direct way to monetize your money through YouTube is to join its partner program. To be eligible, you must have at least 1,000 subscribers and have logged at least 4,000 hours of valid public viewing in the past year.

Once approved, YouTube will begin sending you a share of the advertising revenue generated by your page. Plus, you’ll have access to other monetization opportunities through YouTube, including:

  • Sell ​​products to your viewers through a store on your channel.
  • Sell ​​subscriptions to your channel.
  • Sell ​​”super stickers” that viewers can use during your live chats.

Investigate other sources of income

There are plenty of ways to make money from your content on YouTube without getting paid directly by YouTube. Here is an overview of a few:

If you do product reviews on your site, you can sign up for affiliate programs with e-commerce companies like Amazon. Then, if your viewers buy items through links you post, e-commerce companies will send you a share of the revenue.

As you grow your audience, you may be able to attract the attention of brands who will pay you as an influencer to create content featuring their products or to work with them on sponsored projects.

For example, last year Narvaez partnered with Target to create a series of videos on its channel about black-owned businesses selling their products at Target stores.

Some YouTubers are able to generate revenue by having their viewers pay for them on subscription-based crowdfunding sites like Patreon.

“My Patreon is set up on a monthly basis, or they can sign up for the year with a slight discount,” Narvaez explains. “It’s a place where they can preview my videos or get clips of my lessons on Skillshare.”

You can also fundraise on an ad hoc basis by using crowdfunding sites, such as Kickstarter, and promoting them on your YouTube channel.

Many successful YouTubers earn income by creating courses that teach others how to follow in their footsteps. Narvaez sells Skillshare courses on how to edit and produce videos, for example.

Be patient

It takes time to build a large enough and engaged enough audience to start generating meaningful revenue. Many top YouTubers have spent years building their audience and creating content before they can successfully monetize it. Just building enough subscribers to qualify for the YouTube Partner Program can take time, although if you have a hugely engaged audience, you may be able to secure sponsorship deals before that.

“Generally, I think you should expect it to take at least two to three years before you see some form of consistent income,” Narvaez says.

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Haggai Ndubuisi: From watching American football on YouTube to the NFL https://jj990.info/haggai-ndubuisi-from-watching-american-football-on-youtube-to-the-nfl/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 10:11:46 +0000 https://jj990.info/haggai-ndubuisi-from-watching-american-football-on-youtube-to-the-nfl/ Haggai Ndubuisi was signed by the Arizona Cardinals after crossing the NFL’s International Player Pathway The brutality of life in the NFL did not deter Haggai Ndubuisi from pursuing a career in American football. The 21-year-old Nigerian only started playing the sport four years ago and appears to have capped his remarkable rise earlier this […]]]>
Haggai Ndubuisi was signed by the Arizona Cardinals after crossing the NFL’s International Player Pathway

The brutality of life in the NFL did not deter Haggai Ndubuisi from pursuing a career in American football.

The 21-year-old Nigerian only started playing the sport four years ago and appears to have capped his remarkable rise earlier this year when he signed for the Arizona Cardinals in April.

However, he was dropped from the roster four months later. Yet he vowed to fight his way back to the road that took him from Abuja to Arizona.

“For me there is no looking back,” he told BBC Sport Africa.

“It’s about not giving up. I’ll keep chasing my dream. I’ll just keep training and working really hard and fixing the mistakes and the things that I think I should do better or should have. do better.

“[I will] keep chasing the dream and keep believing and hoping that one day I will also be among the starters at one of the clubs.”

Standing six-foot-six, Ndubuisi grew up playing football and basketball in Nigeria before finding a passion for American football on the internet.

However, West Africa’s largest and most populous nation has few players or clubs in a sport that dominates in the United States.

“American football is not a sport that is in Nigeria per se – it is like a hopeless sport. There is no future,” he said.

“It was basically watching YouTube and going to train on our own. When we started, people thought we were joking.

“Over time, we started to organize camps to attract more people.”

NFL seeks to harness Africa’s potential

In 2021, offensive linesman Ndubuisi joined the UpRise Academy in Ghana, led by two-time Super Bowl winner with the New York Giants, Osi Umenyiora, and former professional basketball player Ejike Ugboaja.

This is part of a drive to expand the scouting operation on the continent for the NFL, which has more than 100 professional players of African descent.

The NFL’s ambition to discover more talent on the continent was underscored when it held its first events on the continent in June, with the first African NFL camp taking place in Ghana.

“We know that Africa probably has the best athletes in the world,” said Umenyiora, who was born in London to Nigerian parents.

“For the NFL, you have to be big, strong, fast, aggressive and smart.

“We went to Senegal, South Africa, Kenya, Ghana and Nigeria. And then we found the best guys we could, and we brought them all to Accra, Ghana.

“We want to provide infrastructure and knowledge for these guys to know what the NFL game is all about. And they’re going to have these opportunities. That’s what we’re here for.”

Speaking at the Accra Camp, NFL International Director of Operations Damani Leech added: “We have over 40 players from seven different countries.

“We could see ourselves being in Nigeria or South Africa, or some other country in the years to come.”

“No one believed that I would make it”

Haggai Ndubuisi
Ndubuisi says just signing for the Cardinals gave him hope, despite being dropped from the squad roster

After his time at UpRise Academy in Ghana, Ndubuisi was on a path where NFL scouts could lay eyes on him.

”It was a one-week camp. Three of us were selected and we were invited to attend the combined NFL camp in London,” he explained.

“I think out of 47, six of us came out of the combined NFL camp in London. Three of us from Nigeria and three other guys.”

From there, Ndubuisi was invited to the NFL’s International Player Pathway program, a ten-week event in Arizona in the United States.

“After my 10 weeks playing American football in the United States during the IPP program, I received a call from the general manager of the Cardinals,” he recalled.

“It felt like they had to try me and teach me a few things. That’s how the Cardinals signed me.”

NFL competitive guidelines allow teams to hold a larger offseason roster, but that must be trimmed by Aug. 15 before the new season — and Ndubuisi’s rise was about to plateau.

“It’s about making the list of 53 players,” said Ndubuisi.

“Everyone was doing their best and just trying to show what they were capable of doing. At the end of the day, they choose who they want to choose.

“It’s all about the numbers.”

Despite his release, bitterness is far from Ndubuisi’s mind.

American football has a low profile in Nigeria, but it has found its way to one of the most lucrative sporting competitions in the world, and he hopes his dreams and those of many others are just beginning.

“To tell the truth, no one ever believed that I was going to reach this height,” he concluded.

“My ambition is to get a new team. Reaching the league alone has brought hope.”

The new NFL season begins Thursday, with the Los Angeles Rams beginning their Super Bowl title defense against the Buffalo Bills.

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Most diabetic foot care YouTube videos ‘are not adequate’ https://jj990.info/most-diabetic-foot-care-youtube-videos-are-not-adequate/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 08:49:54 +0000 https://jj990.info/most-diabetic-foot-care-youtube-videos-are-not-adequate/ medwireNews: YouTube diabetic foot exam videos are popular but of poor quality, UK researchers report. “There is a need for the general public for comprehensive, high-quality diabetic foot examination videos based on scientific sources,” they state. Abdullah Almaqhawi (Leicester General Hospital, UK) and study co-authors reviewed the top 100 videos on YouTube by the search […]]]>

medwireNews: YouTube diabetic foot exam videos are popular but of poor quality, UK researchers report.

“There is a need for the general public for comprehensive, high-quality diabetic foot examination videos based on scientific sources,” they state.

Abdullah Almaqhawi (Leicester General Hospital, UK) and study co-authors reviewed the top 100 videos on YouTube by the search term “diabetic foot exam”, which averaged over 100,000 views each.

Researchers assessed the educational quality of diabetic foot examination-specific videos using the Diabetes UK 15-point annual foot check (DUK-C) scoring checklist tool, and found an average score of 5.07 out of 15 possible; no videos scored 14 or 15.

They also rated the reliability of the video, based on the JAMA criteria (authorship, attribution, timeliness and disclosure) and general teaching quality, using the Global Quality Score (GQS). The average scores for these were only 1.15 out of a possible 4.00 and 2.32 out of a possible 5.00.

Doctors were the most common source of video uploads, at 28%, and their videos had an average DUK-C score of 5.67, which was only slightly above the overall average. It was the same for JAMA score and GQS, at 1.30 and 2.56, respectively.

“It has been suggested that videos created by physicians are more reliable and of higher quality than videos created by non-physicians, although this does not appear to be the case in this case,” Almaqhawi and colleagues write in diabetes medicine.

Instead, top scores came from videos with multiple download sources (6% of all videos), averaging 8.14, 2.00, and 3.14 for DUK-C, JAMAand GQS, respectively.

The findings “imply that publicly available foot care review videos are not an adequate tool for patient education at present,” the team concludes.

medwireNews is an independent medical information service provided by Springer Healthcare Ltd. © 2022 Springer Healthcare Ltd, part of the Springer Nature Group

Diabetes Med 2022; doi:10.1111/dme.14936

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